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Noticeboard

Noticeboard contents : Flu vaccinations, RCGP Lay Members wanted clinics, Text Messaging for appointments, On-Line access, 'Live Well, Feel Better' and Giving up smoking

  • Please note that our flu vaccinations are now in stock so please contact us if you are eligible and would like to take advantage of this.
  • RCGP Patient & Carers Partnership Group – vacancy for 6 new volunteer Lay patient members.

    Lay patient members*. (*Lay is defined as having a non-medical / non-expert background).  Applications are welcomed from all sections of the community.The RCGP is the professional membership body for GPs in the UK.  It is the RCGP’s aspiration that the patient voice is reflected in its policy initiatives and overall strategy. Please contact the Practice Manager if you would be interested or like to learn more about these roles.

  • Text Messaging - we have launched a Text Messaging service to patients mobile phones to confirm when an appointment has been made. For this reason our staff will be checking your mobile number. If you do not want to receive text messages for this purpose please let a member of staff know.  

  • On-Line access. Please see links on the Home Page for more details about on-line access for Appointments, Repeat Prescriptions, access to your Patient Records and access to test results.

  • Live Well, Feel Better - for more details see the link on the home page

 Life Well Feel Better

  • Free Health Checks for all patients aged 40-75 - If you would like to benefit from a free Health Check please contact us. Health Check surgeries will be running from January.

  • ‘Do you want to give up smoking?  Have you been thinking about quitting?  If so, do you know that you can get access to your local stop smoking service who have a proven track record in helping people to stop smoking and stay stop.  If you are interested in giving up or need any advice on the best way to do so why not ring the surgery on the number above and ask about the how you can access the service locally near you’

Test Results

 

When you initially have the test you will be told how long it will be before the results are returned to the practice, however, this will usually be up to approximately 5 working days for blood tests and 7-10 days for x-ray results.

 

Please call after 2pm to enquire about your test results as our reception staff will have more time to deal with your request after this time.

 

Please note that the practice has a strict policy regarding confidentiality and data protection and we will only release test results to the person to whom they relate to unless that person has given prior permission for the release of this data, or they are not capable of understanding the results.

 

It is your responsibility to check your results and to make an appointment to discuss them with your doctor if your are advised to do so.

 

Blood Tests

 

A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken for testing in a laboratory. Blood tests have a wide range of uses and are one of the most common types of medical test. For example, a blood test can be used to:



    • assess your general state of health

 

    • confirm the presence of a bacterial or viral infection

 

    • see how well certain organs, such as the liver and kidneys, are functioning



A blood test usually involves the phlebotomist taking a blood sample from a blood vessel in your arm and the usual place for a sample is the inside of the elbow or wrist, where the veins are relatively close to the surface. Blood samples from children are most commonly taken from the back of the hand. The child's hand will be anaesthetised (numbed) with a special cream before the sample is taken.

 

You can find out more about blood tests, their purpose and the way they are performed on the NHS Choices website.

 

You may be given further instructions with regards to your blood test, depending on what tests are required:

 

Fasting Blood Tests

 

Certain blood tests can be affected by what patients eat and drink and therefore, depending on the test required, you may be requested to fast prior to having your blood test taken. If you are told you will be having a fasting blood test, do not eat or drink anything (except for water) for 14 hours prior to having your blood test.

 

Glucose Tolerance Tests

 

In order to help diagnose diabetes, patients can be asked to have a Glucose Tolerance Test. This test will include two blood tests. Patients are asked to fast for the first blood test (see instructions above). Once the first blood test has been taken, patients will be required to drink 410mls of Lucozade Original (not diet or sport varieties). Patients are required to provide their own Lucozade. The patient should continue to fast for a further two hours, after which a second blood test will be taken. Between the two blood tests, patients are asked to rest as exercise or activity can interfere with the second test result.

 

X-Ray

 

An X-ray is a widely used diagnostic test to examine the inside of the body. X-rays are a very effective way of detecting problems with bones, such as fractures. They can also often identify problems with soft tissue, such as pneumonia or breast cancer.

 

If you have a X-ray, you will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being X-rayed is between the X-ray tube and the photographic plate.

 

An X-ray is usually carried out by a radiographer, a healthcare professional who specialises in using imaging technology, such as X-rays and ultrasound scanners.

 

You can find out more about x-ray tests, how they are performed, their function and the risks by visiting the NHS Choices website.

 

Spirometry Screening

 

To assess how well a patient's lungs work, a breathing test, called spirometry is carried out. As part of the test, you will be required to breathe into a machine called a spirometer.

 

The spirometer takes two measurements: the volume of air you can breathe out in one second (called the forced expiratory volume in one second or FEV1) and the total amount of air you breathe out (called the forced vital capacity or FVC).

 

You may be asked to breathe out a few times to get a consistent reading.

 

The readings are compared with normal measurements for your age, which can show if your airways are obstructed.

 

Prior to the test

 

To enable an accurate reading, try to follow the next few steps:



    • A spirometry screening cannot be done if you have taken antibiotics in the last 6 weeks as this will give inaccurate readings

 


    • If you use inhalers, try not to use your blue, grey, purple or white inhalers for 6 hours or your green inhaler for 12 hours before the test.

 

    • Avoid smoking for 24 hours, if possible

 

    • Postpone the test if you are suffering from a cough or a cold.

 

    • You may be asked to take some steroid tablets for 2 weeks & then to return for a repeat test.

 

 
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